The Clash MMA welterweight title changes hands

A new champion has risen to the top of The Clash MMA’s professional welterweight division.

On Sept. 19, Cody Udy submitted Christian Nava for the welterweight title via arm-triangle choke two minutes and 29 seconds into the third round.

Udy said his fight-winning performance went according to the plan he and his coaches had crafted. “You couldn’t have written it down any better than it went,” Udy said, recalling his coaches’ reaction to the fight.

Udy’s manager and coach David Castillo said Nava made a mistake by initiating the takedown in the first round, which allowed Udy to use his grappling skills to wear Nava out.

“He executed the game plan perfectly,” Castillo said. “Once the fight hit the floor it wasn’t even close.”Udy began his MMA career fighting for the Ultimate Combat Experience in Salt Lake City in 2006. After wrestling at Bear River High School, Udy said he started to miss the competition wrestling provided. Udy said MMA provided the competition he sought and he could fight in the UCE on “three or four days notice.”

Now Udy trains three hours a day, four to five days a week for months before a fight in the octagon.

He primarily trains at The Garage MMA in Layton with Castillo, who owns the facility, and jiu-jitsu coach Anthony Lobato. Reed Romney, the promoter and co-owner of The Clash MMA, said both Castillo and Lobato are two of the best practitioners in the state and their coaching is contributive to Udy’s success in the octagon.Udy’s first title defense has yet to be scheduled. He said he views every fight as an “individual challenge,” and has no plan or preference for who he fights next. Castillo said Udy’s personality doesn’t lend itself to arrogance or “calling out” opponents but he is willing to fight anyone put in front of him.

Castillo said it may be a good idea to defend his newly won title but he would like to use the momentum to propel Udy’s career toward the major MMA promotions like Bellator, World Series of Fighting, or the UFC.

“I want to push him in that direction,” Castillo said.Castillo said he believes Udy will continue to develop in the sport as long as he keeps working as hard as he has in the past.

Since starting his trajectory in MMA, Udy has achieved a brown belt under jiu-jitsu coach Ben Call and a black belt under coach Walt Bayless. With two high level belts, a healthy work ethic and an already lengthy career, Castillo said Udy can present several problems for whoever he fights in the future.
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